Mimi Gardenerd

A Moment in Nature Wood Stork

“The average species persists for something like ten million years. Because this cycle of emergence/extinction has been in place for more than three billion years, vastly more species have been lost to extinction than exist today. Very infrequently, a whole bunch of niches will close at the same time, triggering what is known as a mass extinction.”

The Story of More: How We Got to Climate Change and Where to Go from Here by Author Hope Jahren

A Moment in Nature Red-winged Blackbird

“The Everglades were always a topic, but now they promised to become more than that. They promised to become a reason for things, a central force in my existence at the beginning of my 80th year. Perhaps it had taken me that long to figure out exactly what I was able to contribute, and for me to marshall my forces.” – Voice of the River: Marjory Stoneman Douglas

A Moment in Nature Killdeer

“I threw myself into the delighted atmosphere of the moment with great joy.” The Mermaid and The Bear by Ailish Sinclair

A Moment in Nature Green Heron

Sit in the forest long enough and you begin to see through animal eyes. As the fog of mindlessness starts to clear, thoughts flow away like water, cascading down the mountainsides into the valleys, seeping into the soil, deep into the core of the Earth to be purified, cleansed, reborn into the world. Beginning again as you did when you were a child, but with the knowledge and wisdom of age. Now you are free, ready for civilization.

Nature’s Silent Message
Scott Stillman

A Moment in Nature Peeps

Seeds of faith are always within us; sometimes it takes a crisis to nourish and encourage their growth. – Susan L. Taylor

A Moment in Nature Monk Parakeet

There’s a difference between solitude and loneliness. I can understand the concept of being a monk for a while. Tom Hanks

A Moment in Nature Osprey

One fish, Two fish, Red fish, Blue fish –Dr. Seuss, Seussville

A Moment in Nature Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpeckers battle for ownership with Wood Ducks, European Starlings, Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Red-headed Woodpeckers, Eastern Bluebirds, and Great Crested Flycatchers. Occasionally bats and swifts share roost cavities with Pileated Woodpeckers.

Weeks # 6 & #7 No Sight of the Pileated Woodpecker Pair

My hope is they found a quiet space to raise their young

A Moment in Nature Great Egret

Have patience with all things, But, first of all with yourself. Saint Francis de Sales

A Moment in Nature Pileated Woodpecker

Week #5 observing and recording a video of a wild pair of Pileated Woodpecker who choose to nest in a pole on Flamingo Gardens Wildlife Sanctuary property.

The European Starling nest is not vacant as two of the fledges are learning to forage for food for themselves from a lower cavity their parents have left. And the honey bees are a rich source located in a cavity between theirs and the Pileated Woodpeckers cavity at the top of the pole.

A Moment in Nature Red-winged Blackbird

We are all in this together, by ourselves. Lily Tomlin

A Moment in Nature Burrowing Owl

Should I take the Talon Crunch as a sign of aggression?

Listing Status
Federal Status: Not Listed
FL Status: State-designated Threatened
FNAI Ranks: G4T3/S3 (Globally: Apparently Secure, Sub sp. Rare/ State: Rare)
IUCN Status: LC (Least Concern)

Burrowing owls are different than other owls as they are active during the day time (diurnal) rather than at night (nocturnal) during breeding season. During the non-breeding season, they become more nocturnal.

For more information visit this site Burrowing Owl | FWC (myfwc.com)